Assurance and Humility, A.A. Hodge

The first essential mark of the difference between true and false assurance is to be found in the fact that true assurance works humility. If there is utter humility, you have the sign of the true spirit. A great deal of perfectionism is rotten to the core. All self-consciousness is of the very essence and nature of sin. Then, again, true confidence leads necessarily to

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“…a man who really has the love of God in his heart is always reaching forward to the things which are before.”
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strong desires for more knowledge and more holiness, for unceasing advances of grace. But a man who really has the love of God in his heart is always reaching forward to the things which are before. The more he loves, the more he wants to love, the more he is consecrated, the more consecration he longs for. He has grand ideas and grand aims, but they lie beyond him in heaven.

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2 Responses to Assurance and Humility, A.A. Hodge

  1. The first essential mark of the difference between true and false assurance is to be found in the fact that true assurance works humility. If there is utter humility, you have the sign of the true spirit. A great deal of perfectionism is rotten to the core. All self-consciousness is of the very essence and nature of sin. Then, again, true confidence leads necessarily to strong desires for more knowledge and more holiness, for unceasing advances of grace. But a man who really has the love of God in his heart is always reaching forward to the things which are before. The more he loves, the more he wants to love, the more he is consecrated, the more consecration he longs for. He has grand ideas and grand aims, but they lie beyond him in heaven.

  2. Also worth noting is the context in which Jesus was about to perform his act – an act quite remarkable in its subversion of the prevalent cultural attitude which had seemed to infiltrate the very ranks of the disciples themselves. Guthrie notes that “humility was despised in the ancient world as a sign of weakness.” 2 Pride and ego – the antithesis of humility – found a home in the disciples’ competitive desire to be the Master’s favourite, to hold the chief place in the Master’s kingdom. Luke’s parallel account of the Last Supper, recounting a dispute about greatness (see Luke 22:24-30), describes the same attitude of competitiveness. Within this ego-based climate of mutual distrust Jesus embarks upon his unexpected and subversive act of humility.

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